Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from June, 2016

LITERATURE: The Divine Now

Post 158. Guest Poem

The Divine Now 



Left behind
The Campus Site
To hit the greenish
Mountain heights


All bare-chested
To run free
Feeling grateful
Just to be


I felt like I
Got lifted up
High above
A hill-side top


To let my mind
Do what minds do best
Which is to wander
Effortless-


“The Magic Touch
Between You & I
In perfect tune
As we here lie


The Divine Now
When two soft souls
Float away in
Timelessness”


By Dennis

Image: Supplied by author

You are welcome to subscribe to the Pen of Kesp, monthly newsletter for updates on e-books, art work, blog articles, giveaways, features and more at Pen of Kesp.
Ben Kesp is an author, artist and writer and you can discover more on his e-books and artwork by checking out the Ben Kesp Site.

HIST & MYTH: The Aos Sí

Post 156. Written by Ben Kesp 

The landscape of Ireland is dotted with ancient monuments and with most unexplored it enshrouds them in a veil of mystery. There are numerous mounds, too many to count including Iron Age ring forts and even older tumuli like the one near Grianán of Aileach in Co. Donegal which dates to the Neolithic period. 
In Irish folklore these are often referred to as Fairy Forts dwelled in by fairies and elves. In Irish mythology there exists an ancient and supernatural race known as the Aos Sí or Aes Sídhe who live beneath these forts and mounds. From my previous posts on Irish mythology I have often written about the Other World or Spiritual World that exists parallel with the Earthly World and within this world lives the spirits of the ancient ancestors, gods and nature spirits. Mythology has also recorded that under the terms of defeat the Tuatha Dé Danann retreated underground and Sea God, Manannán mac Lir placed spells of invisibility over parts of Ireland…

LITERATURE: Mondays Book Talk

Post 156. Guest Talk by Sylwia 

The Architect’s Apprenticeby Elif Shafak
I enjoyed every moment spent with Elif Shafak’s imagination and I am her faithful reader. The fame of this modern Turkish writer has spread worldwide and her name is mentioned next to the great Orhan Pamuk (the Nobel Prize Winner), when talking about Turkish literature. This brave feminine writer is called the advocate of women’s rights, minority rights, subcultures, immigrants and freedom of expression. 


There are stories with secrets that can wait centuries to be discovered. Elif Shafak was stuck in a traffic jam in Istanbul when she became mesmerized by a mosque built by Sinan, the chief architect of the Ottoman Empire in the 16th century and one of the greatest in the world’s architectural heritage. Later she saw a portrait of the Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent and behind him stood a large elephant with its mahout. The story found her. This is how a marvellous novel about great men, their servants, apprenti…

HIST & MYTH: The Woman of the Mounds

Post 155. Written by Ben Kesp 

Have you ever wandered an Irish country road in the dark of the night? The moon’s silvery hand bathing the landscape in a silvery glow, casting trees in silhouettes! A faint light in the distance signals a lone house. The darkness becomes alive and scurries of night animals leave traces of sounds in the nearby fields. Then you hear it! The high pitch wails echoes over the landscape. A wail so piercing it puts the hairs standing on your body. Everything stops! What do you do? Frozen in the moment or do you turn and run? But in which direction?
I have met people who have told me they have heard it. Do I believe them? Who I am to judge or deny what they tell me? Yet it could be in jest. What follows? A death in a family, but not any family, but one that can be traced to the ancient Irish royal families!
There was a time when the old Gaelic families hired professional keening women to lament at wakes following the death in the family. Such notable…

LITERATURE: The Vast Horizon

Post 154. Guest Poem.



The Vast Horizon


A Cry
Of deep
Exquisite
Pleasure


Total surrender
In the moment
Animals
Gracious in Motion


The Hunt
The Chase
A deep desire
To conquer


The Vast Horizon
Unknown, endless miles
Insatiable thirst
For discovery


By Dennis


Image: Supplied by Author.

You are welcome to subscribe to the Pen of Kesp, monthly newsletter for updates on e-books, art work, blog articles, giveaways, features and more at Pen of Kesp.
Ben Kesp is an author, artist and writer and you can discover more on his e-books and artwork by checking out the Ben Kesp Site.

LITERATURE: Mondays Book Talk

Post 153. Guest Talk by MikeH



After the Crashby Michel Bussi
After the Crash” (in French “Un avion sans elle") was my first literary encounter with its author Michel Bussi. Presented to me as a gift in March 2015 during a short stay in Paris, its title grabbed my attention due to a strange coincidence; my friend offered me this book only few days after the plane crash which took place in the French Alps. 


Michel Bussi is a French writer of detective novels who is also a political analyst and Professor of Geography at the University of Rouen. According to the Le Figaro list of bestsellers, he was one of the ten bestselling French writers of 2013. “After the Crash” has been translated into 26 languages and sold more than 700,000 copies in its author's native France, and it’s not hard to see why. 
The opening of this thriller is chilling. The recent tragedy in France made the description of a plane full of passengers crashing into a mountainside even more evocative. Back to the …

HIST & MYTH: A Hidden Treasure in Barcelona

Post 152. Guest Post by MikeH

Bio: MikeH, born in Mexico, now living in Barcelona, has an avid interest in ancient history, mythology and a longing to understand early civilisations. When he is not working, you will find him on the tennis paddle court or exploring the historic city of Barcelona while enjoying delicious Spanish tapas. 


In the heart of Barcelona lies the basilica of Saints Justus and Pastor. This fascinating church has a long history related to legends, martyrdom, funerary rites and the supernatural world. Tradition says that this is Barcelona's oldest Christian sanctuary in the city. Whether this is true or not, it is clear that this magnificent building stands in one of the Gothic Quarter's most charming and least explored spots. The temple is also unique because its preservation is exceptional; it has survived wars, looting and religious persecution.
The church has also been the centre of multiple conspiracy theories; its interior holds a tombstone attribute…

LITERATURE: Mondays Book Talk

Post 151. Guest Talk by MikeH

The Historianby Elizabeth Kostova

In 2012, I borrowed “The Historian” from a good friend of mine, who is an avid and critical reader. Having an interest in history and fiction thrillers, the title caught my attention immediately. I started reading the novel on a Sunday afternoon and despite its length, it took me only three weeks to complete it! Simply grasping!
The Historian is the 2005 debut novel of American author Elizabeth Kostova. This book has been described as a combination of genres: gothic, adventure, detective, travelogue, postmodern historical novel, or historical thriller. Kostova proposes a very interesting alternative story by blending the life of Vlad Tepes, prince of Wallachia in the 15th century, and his fictional equivalent "Dracula" from Bram Stoker, together with the story of Paul, a professor; his 16-year-old daughter; and their quest for Vlad's tomb. The novel ties together three separate narratives using letters and o…

HIST & MYTH: The Visions of St. Malachy

Post 150.  Written by Ben Kesp
Responsible for the reformation of the Irish Church and attributed to having prophesied 112 popes before the last judgement, the Irish Saint Malachy certainly left his mark on the Catholic Church.

Born in 1094, Armagh, Ireland St. Malachy went on to become the Archbishop of Armagh. During his reign he set about reforming the Irish Church in Ireland during the twelfth century, aligning it with the Church in Rome. This led to the introduction of the Roman religious orders in Ireland. The Irish monasteries at this time had been weakened after the constant plundering and attacks from Viking invasions beginning in the 9th Century. Many churches were attacked and libraries burned. Christianity declined and paganism returned in parts of Ireland brought on by the new invaders. The time of enlightenment, discipline and learning had faded quenching the light on Ireland’s golden era.

Prior to St. Malachy’s reformation, King Brian Ború (Ireland’s High King) h…